EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

The Impact of Preferential Trade Arrangements on EU Imports from Developing Countries: The Case of Fresh Cut Flowers

Andrew Muhammad (), William A. Amponsah and Jennifer H. Dennis

Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, 2010, vol. 32, issue 2, 254-274

Abstract: This study examines the effects that the Generalized System of Preferences schemes for developing countries (GSP + ) have on European Union (EU) demand for imported cut flowers. Without GSP + , a tariff would be applied to flowers from Colombia and Ecuador. Results show that Colombian carnation prices have a negative effect on EU flower expenditures, resulting in preferential treatment for Colombia being mostly trade-creating. When a tariff is applied to Colombia, imports of Colombian carnations and Kenyan roses fell by 7.3% and 1.9%, respectively, and other flowers from Ecuador and Israel fell by 1.9% and 1.8%, respectively. Total EU flower imports fell by 1.4%.

Date: 2010
References: View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (2) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/aepp/ppp008 (application/pdf)
Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

Related works:
Journal Article: The Impact of Preferential Trade Arrangements on EU Imports from Developing Countries: The Case of Fresh Cut Flowers (2010) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:oup:apecpp:v:32:y:2010:i:2:p:254-274.

Ordering information: This journal article can be ordered from
http://www.oup.co.uk/journals

Access Statistics for this article

Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy is currently edited by Timothy ParkEditor-Name: Tomislav VukinaEditor-Name: Ian Sheldon

More articles in Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy from Agricultural and Applied Economics Association Oxford University Press, Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, UK. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Oxford University Press ().

 
Page updated 2020-03-29
Handle: RePEc:oup:apecpp:v:32:y:2010:i:2:p:254-274.