EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Ethnic Enclaves and the Economic Success of Immigrants—Evidence from a Natural Experiment

Per-Anders Edin (), Peter Fredriksson and Olof Åslund

The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 2003, vol. 118, issue 1, 329-357

Abstract: Recent immigrants tend to locate in ethnic "enclaves" within metropolitan areas. The economic consequence of living in such enclaves is still an unresolved issue. We use data from an immigrant policy initiative in Sweden, when government authorities distributed refugee immigrants across locales in a way that we argue is exogenous. This policy initiative provides a unique natural experiment, which allows us to estimate the causal effect on labor market outcomes of living in enclaves. We find substantive evidence of sorting across locations. When sorting is taken into account, living in enclaves improves labor market outcomes for less skilled immigrants: the earnings gain associated with a standard deviation increase in ethnic concentration is 13 percent. Furthermore, the quality of the enclave seems to matter. Members of high-income ethnic groups gain more from living in an enclave than members of low-income ethnic groups.

Date: 2003
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (324) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://hdl.handle.net/10.1162/00335530360535225 (application/pdf)
Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

Related works:
Working Paper: Ethnic Enclaves and the Economic Success of Immigrants - Evidence from a Natural Experiment (2001) Downloads
Working Paper: Ethnic enclaves and the economic success of immigrants - evidence from a natural experiment (2000) Downloads
Working Paper: Ethnic Enclaves and the Economic Success of Immigrants - Evidence from a Natural Experiment (2000)
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:oup:qjecon:v:118:y:2003:i:1:p:329-357.

Access Statistics for this article

The Quarterly Journal of Economics is currently edited by Robert J. Barro, Elhanan Helpman, Lawrence F. Katz and Andrei Schleifer

More articles in The Quarterly Journal of Economics from Oxford University Press
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Oxford University Press ().

 
Page updated 2019-11-16
Handle: RePEc:oup:qjecon:v:118:y:2003:i:1:p:329-357.