EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

The Potential and Limitations of Self-Targeted Food Subsidies

Harold Alderman () and Kathy Lindert

World Bank Research Observer, 1998, vol. 13, issue 2, 213-29

Abstract: Can self-selection of subsidized commodities be used as a mechanism to transfer income to the poor? Evidence from two self-targeting programs, one in South Africa and one in Tunisia, shows that although self-targeting can clearly improve the distribution of food subsidies to the poorest members of society, its power to alleviate poverty and reduce income disparities is limited by preference patterns, income inequality, and the size of the individual subsidies. Self-targeting through quality and product differentiation can be a useful means to reform existing universal subsidy schemes, but it should be considered a transitional tool while the capacity for implementing more precise mechanisms is developed. Copyright 1998 by Oxford University Press.

Date: 1998
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations View citations in EconPapers (17) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.worldbank.org/research/journals/wbro/obsaug98/pdf/article4.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:oup:wbrobs:v:13:y:1998:i:2:p:213-29

Ordering information: This journal article can be ordered from
http://www.oup.co.uk/journals

Access Statistics for this article

World Bank Research Observer is currently edited by Shantayanan Devarajan

More articles in World Bank Research Observer from World Bank Group Oxford University Press, Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, UK. Contact information at EDIRC.
Series data maintained by Oxford University Press ().

 
Page updated 2017-11-07
Handle: RePEc:oup:wbrobs:v:13:y:1998:i:2:p:213-29