EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Moderating role of transformational leadership styles of hospital management boards on adoption of mobile health innovations by hospitals in Kenya

Bahati Prince Ngongo, Phares Ochola, Joyce Ndegwa and Paul Katuse
Additional contact information
Bahati Prince Ngongo: Chandaria School of Business, United States International University –Africa, Nairobi, Kenya
Phares Ochola: Chandaria School of Business, United States International University –Africa, Nairobi, Kenya
Joyce Ndegwa: Chandaria School of Business, United States International University –Africa, Nairobi, Kenya
Paul Katuse: Chandaria School of Business, United States International University –Africa, Nairobi, Kenya

International Journal of Research in Business and Social Science (2147-4478), 2019, vol. 8, issue 5, 286-294

Abstract: Sub-Saharan Africa lags other regions in the adoption of both Patient-Centered (PC) and Facility Centered (FC) mobile health (m-health) applications. Transformational Leadership Style (TLS) of Hospital Management Boards (HMBs) is catalytic for the adoption of disruptive technologies such as m-health by hospitals. There is limited evidence on the effect of TLS of HMBs in the adoption of innovations in Low- and Middle-Income Countries (LMICS). This study investigated the moderating role of TLS of HMBs on the adoption of PC and FC m-health by hospitals in Kenya. It used the Logit Regression Model to test null hypotheses that the four constructs of TLS (Idealized Influence (II), Individualized Consideration (IC), Inspirational Motivation (IM), Intellectual Stimulation (IS)) individually or combined had no significant moderating effect on adoption of PC and FC m-health applications. Primary data was collected from a representative sample size of 211 Top Executives (TEs) of level 4 to 6 hospitals who evaluated the TLS of their HMBs on m-health adoption. At a 5% level of significance, the study found that only the combined application of the four constructs (II, IC, IM, IS) significantly moderated the adoption of PC m-health (p=0.046) but did not moderate FC m-health (p=0.345). Each incremental application of TLS would increase the odds of adopting PC m-health by 1.002 but not for FC. Therefore, this study recommends the capacity strengthening of HMBs in TLS to scale up PC m-health adoption in Kenya and other LMICs. It also recommends a differentiated approach to policies, practices, and theories of adoption of innovations using the PC-FC models. Key Words: Mobile Health, Adoption of M-Health, Digital Health, Health Innovations, Kenya

Date: 2019
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://www.ssbfnet.com/ojs/index.php/ijrbs/article/view/474/448 (application/pdf)
https://www.ssbfnet.com/ojs/index.php/ijrbs/article/view/474 (text/html)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:rbs:ijbrss:v:8:y:2019:i:5:p:286-294

Access Statistics for this article

International Journal of Research in Business and Social Science (2147-4478) is currently edited by Umit Hacioglu

More articles in International Journal of Research in Business and Social Science (2147-4478) from Center for the Strategic Studies in Business and Finance Istanbul Medipol University, School of Business. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Umit Hacioglu ().

 
Page updated 2019-09-09
Handle: RePEc:rbs:ijbrss:v:8:y:2019:i:5:p:286-294