EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Does Training, Job Autonomy and Career Planning Predict Employees’ Adaptive Performance?

Abubakar Tabiu, Faizuniah Pangil and Siti Zubaidah Othman

Global Business Review, 2020, vol. 21, issue 3, 713-724

Abstract: Despite the importance of adaptive performance towards enhancing organizational effectiveness, the role of organizational human resource management (HRM) practices as predictors of adaptive performance remains unexplored. This study examined the predictive influence of training, career planning and job autonomy on employees’ adaptive performance. The study employed a survey method coupled with stratified sampling technique among 265 local government employees in Nigeria. The partial least square structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) was performed. The study revealed that training, career planning and job autonomy significantly influence employees’ adaptive performance. The results suggested that greater the attention given to employees’ training, career planning and job autonomy in the organization, higher will be their adaptive performance. It was identified that HRM practices are important predictors of employees’ adaptive performance that managers and practitioners need to consider in promoting higher adaptive behaviours in the organization. Implications of the study and future research on HRM practices and adaptive performance are discussed in this article.

Keywords: Adaptive performance; career planning; job autonomy; training; HRM practices (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2020
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0972150918779159 (text/html)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:sae:globus:v:21:y:2020:i:3:p:713-724

DOI: 10.1177/0972150918779159

Access Statistics for this article

More articles in Global Business Review from International Management Institute
Bibliographic data for series maintained by SAGE Publications ().

 
Page updated 2020-09-19
Handle: RePEc:sae:globus:v:21:y:2020:i:3:p:713-724