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Contextual Factors Which Affect the Success of Microcredit Programs Among Women in Ghana

Kwadwo Afriyie, John Kuumuori Ganle, Alexander Yao Segbefia, Pauline Kamau and Grace Wamue-Ngare
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Kwadwo Afriyie: Kwadwo Afriyie has an MPhil degree in Geography and Resource Development from the University of Ghana and is a senior lecturer at Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology with research interest in rural livelihoods, microfinance, land-use and land cover changes, peri-urbanism, and local governance.[E-mail: kwadwo_afriyie@yahoo.com]
John Kuumuori Ganle: John Kuumuori Ganle has a DPhil degree in Public Health from the University of Oxford and is a lecturer at School of Public Health, University of Ghana, Legon, Accra with research interest in issues of public health and microfinance.
Alexander Yao Segbefia: Alexander Yao Segbefia has a PhD in Geography and Resource Development from the University of Ghana and is a senior lecturer at Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology with research interest in tourism, transportation, and microfinance.
Pauline Kamau: Pauline Kamau holds a PhD in Gender and Development Studies from Kenyatta University and is a part-time lecturer at the university. Her research interest covers gender power relations, gender issues in urbanity and migration, and youth and women empowerment.
Grace Wamue-Ngare: Grace Wamue-Ngare is an associate professor in the Department of Gender and Development Studies, Kenyatta University, Kenya and specialized in gender issues and microfinance resources.

Journal of Developing Societies, 2020, vol. 36, issue 2, 229-254

Abstract: Microcredit programs usually target poor rural women to reduce poverty and empower the women involved. The general body of existing research provides conflicting evidence, depending on context, poverty reduction and empowerment may or may not be partially achieved. Research on the effects of context on microcredit is limited in Ghana. Based on focus group discussions and in-depth interviews with stakeholders, the contextual factors that affect microcredit for poverty reduction among women are explored. The findings of this study suggest that the orthodox use of social collateral through group lending doesn’t fully account for why some microlending programs are effective, and others are not. Contextual factors appear to make the difference.

Keywords: Contextual factors; microcredit; women empowerment; poverty reduction; Ghana (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2020
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:sae:jodeso:v:36:y:2020:i:2:p:229-254

DOI: 10.1177/0169796X20909032

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