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High-rise Living in Singapore Public Housing

Belinda Yuen, Anthony Yeh, Stephen John Appold, George Earl, John Ting and Lanny Kurnianingrum Kwee
Additional contact information
Belinda Yuen: Department of Real Estate, School of Design and Environment, National University of Singapore, 4 Architecture Drive, Singapore 117566. rstbyuen@nus.edu.sg
Anthony Yeh: Centre of Urban Planning and Environmental Management, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong. hdxugoy@hkucc.hku.hk
Stephen John Appold: Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise, Kenan-Flagler Business School, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB 3440, Kenan Center Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3400, USA. appold@unc.edu
George Earl: Faculty of the Built Environment, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia. g.Earl@unsw.edu.au
John Ting: Immediate Past President of the Singapore Institute of Architects, 79 Neil Road, Singapore 088904.
Lanny Kurnianingrum Kwee: Department of Real Estate, School of Design and Environment, National University of Singapore, 4 Architecture Drive, Singapore 117566.

Urban Studies, 2006, vol. 43, issue 3, 583-600

Abstract: In recent years, amid the debates of sustainable development and urban compactness, there has been a widening interest to reintroduce high-rise living in cities. Several European cities including London and Manchester are once again building high-rise housing as part of their urban housing strategy. Elsewhere, in Asia, Hong Kong and Singapore are distinguished by their high-rise public housing developments. With nearly half of the world's population living in urban areas, the unfolding trend is towards a more urban-style development with taller buildings included as an inevitable housing solution. Drawing on findings from a study of Singapore public housing residents' living experience, this paper aims to look at the increasingly important question of the liveability of high-rise living by discussing the occupants' appreciation and concerns of high-rise.

Date: 2006
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