EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Gentrification in the wake of a hurricane: New Orleans after Katrina

Eric Joseph van Holm and Christopher K Wyczalkowski
Additional contact information
Eric Joseph van Holm: School of Public Affairs, Center for Science, Technology and Environmental Policy Studies, Arizona State University, USA
Christopher K Wyczalkowski: Urban Studies Institute, Georgia State University, USA

Urban Studies, 2019, vol. 56, issue 13, 2763-2778

Abstract: Hurricane Katrina struck the city of New Orleans in August of 2005, devastating the built environment and displacing nearly one-third of the city’s residents. Despite the considerable literature that exists concerning Hurricane Katrina, the storm’s long-term impact on neighbourhood change in New Orleans has not been fully addressed. In this article we analyse the potential for Hurricane Katrina to have contributed to patterns of gentrification during the city’s recovery one decade after the storm. We study the association between Hurricane Katrina and neighbourhood change using data on the damage from the storm at the census tract level and Freeman’s (2005) gentrification framework. We find that damage is positively associated with the likelihood of a neighbourhood gentrifying in New Orleans after one decade, which drives our recommendations for policy makers to take greater concern for their communities during the process of rebuilding from storm damage.

Keywords: displacement/gentrification; Hurricane Katrina; inequality; local government; neighbourhood; New Orleans; social justice; æµ ç¦»å¤±æ‰€/绅士化; å ¡ç‰¹é‡Œå¨œé£“é£Ž; ä¸ å¹³ç­‰; 地方政府; 街区; 新奥尔良; 社会正义 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2019
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0042098018800445 (text/html)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:sae:urbstu:v:56:y:2019:i:13:p:2763-2778

Access Statistics for this article

More articles in Urban Studies from Urban Studies Journal Limited
Bibliographic data for series maintained by SAGE Publications ().

 
Page updated 2019-10-13
Handle: RePEc:sae:urbstu:v:56:y:2019:i:13:p:2763-2778