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Linking investment spikes and productivity growth

Pinar Geylani and Spiro Stefanou ()

Empirical Economics, 2013, vol. 45, issue 1, 157-178

Abstract: We investigate the relationship between productivity growth and investment spikes using Census Bureau’s plant-level dataset for the U.S. food manufacturing industry. There are differences in productivity growth and investment spike patterns across different sub-industries and food manufacturing industry in general. Our study finds empirical support for the learning-by-doing hypothesis by identifying some cases where the impact of investment spikes on TFP growth presents a U-shaped investment age–productivity growth pattern. However, efficiency and the learning period associated with investment spikes differ among plants across industries. The most pronounced impact of investment age on productivity growth (5.3 % for meat products, 4% for dairy products, and 2.8 % in all food manufacturing plants) occurs during the fifth year of post-investment spike. Thus, in general, the productivity gains tend to be fully realized with a 5-year technology learning period for this industry. Copyright The Author(s) 2013

Keywords: Productivity growth; Lumpy investments; Micro data; U.S. Food industry; D24; L66; 033 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2013
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DOI: 10.1007/s00181-012-0599-8

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