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Borrower credit access and credit performance after loan modifications

Lei Ding ()
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Lei Ding: Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia

Empirical Economics, 2017, vol. 52, issue 3, 977-1005

Abstract: Abstract While the preventive effect of loan modifications on mortgage default has been well-documented, evidence on the broad consequences of modifications has been fairly limited. Based on two unique loan-level data sets with borrower credit profiles, this study reports novel empirical evidence on how homeowners manage their credit before and after receiving modifications. The paper has several main findings. First, loan modifications improve borrowers’ overall credit standing and access to credit. Modifications that provide principal reduction, rate reduction, or greater payment relief, as well as those received by borrowers not in financial catastrophe, lead to a larger improvement in borrowers’ credit rating than others. Second, loan modifications lead to a slight increase in borrowers’ debts, primarily on home equity line of credit accounts and auto loans. Third, borrowers’ performance on nonmortgage accounts, however, has not been negatively impacted by modifications. This study demonstrates that interventions designed to improve household balance sheets could have a direct and sizeable impact on borrower financial outcomes.

Keywords: Loan modification; Credit score; Credit performance; Mortgage (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D12 E20 E51 E65 G21 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2017
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