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Harmful drinking after job loss: a stronger association during the post-2008 economic crisis?

Moniek C. M. Goeij, Jan-Willem Bruggink, Ferdy Otten and Anton E. Kunst ()
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Moniek C. M. Goeij: University of Amsterdam
Jan-Willem Bruggink: Statistics Netherlands
Ferdy Otten: Statistics Netherlands
Anton E. Kunst: University of Amsterdam

International Journal of Public Health, 2017, vol. 62, issue 5, 563-572

Abstract: Abstract Objectives This study investigated, among the Dutch working population, whether job loss during the post-2008 economic crisis is associated with harmful drinking and whether this association is stronger than before the crisis. Methods Repeated cross-sectional data from the Dutch Health Interview Survey 2004–2013 were used to define episodic drinking (≥6 glasses on 1 day ≥1/week) and chronic drinking (≥14 glasses/week for women and ≥21 for men). These data were linked to longitudinal data from tax registries, to measure the experience and duration of job loss during a 5-year working history. Results Before the crisis, job loss experience and duration were not associated with harmful drinking. During the crisis, job loss for more than 6 months was associated with episodic drinking [OR 1.40 (95% CI 1.01; 1.94)], while current job loss was associated with chronic drinking [OR 1.43 (95% CI 1.03; 1.98)]. These associations were most clear in men and different between the pre-crisis and crisis period (p interaction = 0.023 and 0.035, respectively). Conclusions The results suggest that economic crises strengthen the potential impact of job loss on harmful drinking, predominately among men.

Keywords: Alcohol; Drinking; Economic crisis; Job loss; Sex (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2017
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