EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Total work and gender: facts and possible explanations

Michael Burda (), Daniel Hamermesh () and Philippe Weil ()

Journal of Population Economics, 2013, vol. 26, issue 1, 239-261

Abstract: Time-diary data from 27 countries show a negative relationship between GDP per-capita and gender differences in total work—for pay and at home. In rich non-Catholic countries, men and women average about the same amount of total work. Survey results show scholars and the general public believe that women work more. Widespread average equality does not arise from gender differences in the price of time, intra-family bargaining or spousal complementarity. Several theories, including ones based on social norms, might explain these findings and are consistent with evidence from the World Values Surveys and microeconomic data from Australia and Germany. Copyright The Author(s) 2013

Keywords: Time use; Gender differences; Household production; J22; J16; D13 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2013
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (61) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00148-012-0408-x (text/html)
Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

Related works:
Working Paper: Total work and gender facts and possible explanations (2012) Downloads
Working Paper: Total work and gender: facts and possible explanations (2012) Downloads
Working Paper: Total Work and Gender: Facts and Possible Explanations (2012) Downloads
Working Paper: Total work and gender: facts and possible explanations (2012) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:26:y:2013:i:1:p:239-261

Ordering information: This journal article can be ordered from
http://www.springer. ... tion/journal/148/PS2

Access Statistics for this article

Journal of Population Economics is currently edited by K.F. Zimmermann

More articles in Journal of Population Economics from Springer, European Society for Population Economics Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Sonal Shukla ().

 
Page updated 2019-04-11
Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:26:y:2013:i:1:p:239-261