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Perceptions, behavioral expectations, and implementation timing for response actions in a hurricane emergency

Shih-Kai Huang (), Hao-Che Wu (), Michael K. Lindell (), Hung-Lung Wei () and Charles D. Samuelson ()
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Shih-Kai Huang: Jacksonville State University
Hao-Che Wu: Oklahoma State University
Michael K. Lindell: University of Washington
Hung-Lung Wei: John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY
Charles D. Samuelson: Texas A&M University

Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, 2017, vol. 88, issue 1, 533-558

Abstract: Abstract This study examined the perceived attributes, behavioral expectations, and expected implementation timing of 11 organizational emergency response actions for hurricane emergencies. The perceived attributes of the hurricane response actions were characterized by two hazard-related attributes (effectiveness for person protection and property protection) and five resource-related attributes (financial costs, required knowledge/skill, required equipment, required time/effort, and required cooperation). A total of 155 introductory psychology students responded to a hypothetical scenario involving an approaching Category 4 hurricane. The data collected in this study explain previous findings of untimely protective action decision making. Specifically, these data reveal distinctly different patterns for the expected implementation of preparatory actions and evacuation recommendations. Participants used the hazard-related and resource-related attributes to differentiate among the response actions and the expected timing of implementation. Moreover, participants’ behavioral expectations and expected implementation timing for the response actions were most strongly correlated with those actions’ effectiveness for person protection. Finally, participants reported evacuation implementation times that were consistent with a phased evacuation strategy in which risk areas are evacuated in order of their proximity to the coast. However, the late initiation of evacuation in risk areas closest to the coast could lead to very late evacuation of risk areas farther inland.

Keywords: Preparatory actions; Evacuation; Response action attributes; Trigger timing; Hurricane (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2017
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