EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Recovery from stunting in early childhood and subsequent schooling outcomes: Evidence from NIDS Waves 1–5

Daniela Casale

Development Southern Africa, 2020, vol. 37, issue 3, 483-500

Abstract: While an extensive literature documents the negative effects of stunting on children’s developmental potential, there is far less evidence on whether a recovery from stunting in childhood – often referred to as ‘catch-up growth’– helps mitigate the negative effects of early growth retardation. This paper explores the association between catch-up growth in early childhood and subsequent schooling outcomes using data from the first five waves of NIDS. The findings suggest that children who recovered from stunting in early childhood go on to complete fewer years of schooling compared to their non-stunted counterparts, driven in large part by a slower progression through school. However, there also appear to be heterogeneous effects depending on the extent of recovery; the small proportion of children who recovered substantially exhibit similar schooling outcomes to the non-stunted group. These results have important implications for the timing of nutritional (and other) investments in the early childhood period.

Date: 2020
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/0376835X.2020.1715790 (text/html)
Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

Related works:
Working Paper: Recovery from stunting in early childhood and subsequent schooling outcomes: Evidence from NIDS Waves 1-5 (2019) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:taf:deveza:v:37:y:2020:i:3:p:483-500

Ordering information: This journal article can be ordered from
http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/CDSA20

DOI: 10.1080/0376835X.2020.1715790

Access Statistics for this article

Development Southern Africa is currently edited by Marie Kirsten

More articles in Development Southern Africa from Taylor & Francis Journals
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Chris Longhurst ().

 
Page updated 2020-09-04
Handle: RePEc:taf:deveza:v:37:y:2020:i:3:p:483-500