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PlusCa Change? evidence on global trends in gender norms and stereotypes

Stephanie Seguino ()

Feminist Economics, 2007, vol. 13, issue 2, 1-28

Abstract: Gender norms and stereotypes that perpetuate inequality are deeply embedded in social and individual consciousness and, as a result, are resistant to change. Gender stratification theories propose that women's control over material resources can increase bargaining power to leverage change in key institutions, prompting a shift to more equitable norms. By extension, policies that promote women's paid employment should serve as a fulcrum for gender equitable change. Is there any evidence to support this hypothesis? Investigating this requires a means to capture gender norms and stereotypes. The World Values Survey provides just such a mechanism because it contains a series of gender questions that span a twenty-year period and includes respondents from more than seventy countries. This paper uses that survey's data to analyze determinants of trends in norms and stereotypes over time and across countries, and finds evidence that increases in women's paid employment promotes gender equitable norms and stereotypes.

Keywords: Economic growth; employment; gender ideology; gender norms and stereotypes; gender roles; globalization; JEL Codes: A14; J16; J21 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2007
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DOI: 10.1080/13545700601184880

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