EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Climate Instability, Urbanisation and International Migration

Mathilde Maurel () and Michele Tuccio

Journal of Development Studies, 2016, vol. 52, issue 5, 735-752

Abstract: This paper focuses on climate-induced migration. We construct a simple theoretical model where, in a first step, climate shocks accelerate the transition from the traditional to the modern sector, leading rural workers to move to urban centres within national borders, while in a second step, downward pressures on wages due to the greater labour supply in cities push people to engage in international migration. To test this hypothesis, we exploit a rich panel dataset, displaying a representative picture of bilateral migration flows and climatic data across 222 countries for the period 1960–2000. Findings suggest that in the next few years the climate-induced growth rate of migrant stocks might be in a range between 8.6 per cent and 12.8 per cent, especially from developing countries, where the level of rural employment is more likely to be affected by climatic shocks.

Date: 2016
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (16) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/00220388.2015.1121240 (text/html)
Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

Related works:
Working Paper: Climate instability, urbanization and international migration (2016)
Working Paper: Climate instability, urbanization and international migration (2016)
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:52:y:2016:i:5:p:735-752

Ordering information: This journal article can be ordered from
http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/FJDS20

DOI: 10.1080/00220388.2015.1121240

Access Statistics for this article

Journal of Development Studies is currently edited by Howard White, Oliver Morrissey and Ken Shadlen

More articles in Journal of Development Studies from Taylor & Francis Journals
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Chris Longhurst ().

 
Page updated 2020-11-21
Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:52:y:2016:i:5:p:735-752