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Religious Fractionalisation and Crimes in Disaster-Affected Communities: Survey Evidence from Bangladesh

Masahiro Shoji ()

Journal of Development Studies, 2018, vol. 54, issue 10, 1891-1911

Abstract: This study employs unique household data collected in cyclone-affected communities in Bangladesh to investigate whether religious fractionalisation is associated with crime victimisation after disasters. The identification strategy relies on two characteristics of the study area: 1) its religious composition is stable; and 2) its households’ pre-disaster socio-economic status is uncorrelated with religious fractionalisation and disaster damage after controlling for the observed characteristics. The findings suggest that households in disaster-affected and religiously fractionalised communities are more likely to be victims after a natural disaster than are households in non-fractionalised communities. This study also finds empirical support for the idea that the result is driven by the misallocation of disaster relief in fractionalised communities.

Date: 2018
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DOI: 10.1080/00220388.2017.1393521

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