Economics at your fingertips  

Factionalism and Chinese-style democracy: the 2017 Hong Kong Chief Executive election

Sonny Shiu-Hing Lo

Asia Pacific Journal of Public Administration, 2017, vol. 39, issue 2, 100-119

Abstract: The 2017 Chief Executive election in Hong Kong demonstrated the severity of factional politics in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, where the pro-democracy faction has been struggling for power against the pro-Beijing camp. It also showed Mainland China’s emphasis on the centralist aspect of the principle of democratic centralism in which the Hong Kong Chief Executive was elected by a relatively small group of elites, most of whom were under the influence of Beijing. The Chinese-style of democracy was reflected in the desire of Mainland officials and the pro-Beijing press to ensure the easy victory of Carrie Lam, who was the only candidate from the pro-Beijing faction. The efforts of Beijing and its agents to secure Lam’s victory pervaded the pre-nomination, nomination, campaign and election, and post-election stages of the electoral process. The process highlighted the uneasiness of China in possibly having to deal with an uncertain outcome of a limitedly pluralistic electoral experience.

Date: 2017
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link) (text/html)
Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link:

Ordering information: This journal article can be ordered from

Access Statistics for this article

Asia Pacific Journal of Public Administration is currently edited by Ian Thynne and Danny Lam

More articles in Asia Pacific Journal of Public Administration from Taylor & Francis Journals
Series data maintained by Chris Longhurst ().

Page updated 2018-01-06
Handle: RePEc:taf:rapaxx:v:39:y:2017:i:2:p:100-119