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Why does innovation in government occur and persist? Evidence from the Australian government

Mehmet Akif Demircioglu

Asia Pacific Journal of Public Administration, 2019, vol. 41, issue 4, 217-229

Abstract: Many studies of public sector innovation concern the organisational and individual levels, examining why certain public organisations, leaders and staff are more innovative than others. Wider questions remain as to why some governments are particularly innovative, and how innovation can persist in governments. To answer these questions, Australian experience is addressed in terms of why, and the extent to which, the Australian government is innovative. An analysis of government and government-related documents, as well as scholarly literature on public management reform and innovation attempts, indicates that the crucial factors affecting innovation have been the perception of innovation as a necessity, the duration and intensity of innovation, the span and scope of innovation, the extent of grassroots involvement in generating innovation, and the various isomorphic effects related to innovation. The nature and significance of each of these factors are discussed, along with insights on innovativeness in government and the value of further relevant research and analysis.

Date: 2019
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