EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

The Quest for the Cup: Assessing the Economic Impact of the World Cup

Robert Baade and Victor Matheson ()

Regional Studies, 2004, vol. 38, issue 4, 343-354

Abstract: Baade R. A. and Matheson V. A. (2004) The quest for the cup: assessing the economic impact of the World Cup, Reg. Studies 38, 343-354. Hosting the World Cup, the world's second largest sporting event, is a potentially expensive affair. The co-hosts of the 2002 games, Japan and South Korea, spent a combined US$4 billion building new facilities or refurbishing old facilities in preparation for the event. An ex post analysis of the 1994 World Cup held in the US suggests that the economic impact of the event cannot justify this magnitude of expenditures and that host cities experienced cumulative losses of $5·5 to $9·3 billion as opposed to ex ante estimates of a $4 billion gain touted by event boosters. Potential hosts should consider with care whether the award of the World Cup is an honour or a burden.

Keywords: Sports; Soccer; Football; World Cup; Stadiums; Sports; 'Soccer'; Football; Coupe du Monde Stades; Sport; Fussball; Weltmeisterschaftspokal Stadien; Deportes; Futbol; Copa del Mundo; Estadios (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2004
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations View citations in EconPapers (42) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03434002000213888 (text/html)
Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

Related works:
Working Paper: The Quest for the Cup: Assessing the Economic Impact of the World Cup (2004)
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:taf:regstd:v:38:y:2004:i:4:p:343-354

Ordering information: This journal article can be ordered from
http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/CRES20

Access Statistics for this article

Regional Studies is currently edited by Ivan Turok

More articles in Regional Studies from Taylor & Francis Journals
Series data maintained by Chris Longhurst ().

 
Page updated 2017-10-21
Handle: RePEc:taf:regstd:v:38:y:2004:i:4:p:343-354