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For whom are cities good places to live?

Fredrik Carlsen and Stefan Leknes ()

Regional Studies, 2022, vol. 56, issue 12, 2177-2190

Abstract: In this paper we use survey data to examine heterogeneity in the urban gradient of life satisfaction. Are some sociodemographic groups more satisfied in cities than others? We find that young persons with tertiary education generally report higher levels of life satisfaction in Norway’s largest city, Oslo, whereas the elderly and the less educated are more satisfied elsewhere. These results may shed light on the ‘urban paradox’: the tendency of large cities in developed countries to have low levels of average subjective well-being and also why the received literature has produced mixed results, as the sociodemographic composition of cities varies.

Date: 2022
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Related works:
Working Paper: For whom are cities good places to live? (2021) Downloads
Working Paper: For whom are cities good places to live? (2019) Downloads
Working Paper: For whom are cities good places to live? (2015) Downloads
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DOI: 10.1080/00343404.2022.2046724

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