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Work--Family Balance: Is the Social Economy Sector More Supportive … and is this because of its More Democratic Management?

Diane-Gabrielle Tremblay

Review of Social Economy, 2012, vol. 70, issue 2, 200-232

Abstract: This research compares perceived organizational support to work--family balance measures and policies in various work environments to determine whether the organizational context can be a mediating variable or whether the social economy sector, with its mission and management approach (participatory decision-making) might have an influence on organizational support to work--family balance. We studied the social economy sector and compared findings with three other sectors in the public service that have a public service mission but not the same democratic or participatory management mode: a metropolitan police service, social work, and nursing, all in the same city. Our research identifies many significant differences between the four sectors, essentially owing to the characteristics of the social economy sector. In addition to our quantitative research, we conducted interviews (36) in the sector and results indicate that the specificity of the social economy sector, i.e. mission and management mode, explain the overriding concern for work--life balance in the social economy sector.

Date: 2012
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DOI: 10.1080/00346764.2011.632324

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