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Does Climate Change Bolster the Case for Fishery Reform in Asia?

Christopher Costello
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Christopher Costello: Professor, Bren School, University of California Santa Barbara and Research Associate, National Bureau of Economic Research. Author email: costello@bren.ucsb.edu.

Asian Development Review, 2018, vol. 35, issue 2, 31-57

Abstract: I examine the estimated economic, ecological, and food security effects of future fishery management reform in Asia. Without climate change, most Asian fisheries stand to gain substantially from reforms. Optimizing fishery management could increase catch by 24% and profit by 34% over business-as-usual management. These benefits arise from fishing some stocks more conservatively and others more aggressively. Although climate change is expected to reduce carrying capacity in 55% of Asian fisheries, I find that under climate change large benefits from fishery management reform are maintained, though these benefits are heterogeneous. The case for reform remains strong for both catch and profit, though these numbers are slightly lower than in the no-climate change case. These results suggest that, to maximize economic output and food security, Asian fisheries will benefit substantially from the transition to catch shares or other economically rational fishery management institutions, despite the looming effects of climate change.

Keywords: Asia; climate change; fisheries; rights-based management (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: Q22 Q28 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2018
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