EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Short-Run Effects of Parental Job Loss on Child Health

Jessamyn Schaller () and Mariana Zerpa
Additional contact information
Jessamyn Schaller: Department of Economics, University of Arizona
Mariana Zerpa: Department of Economics, University of Leuven (KU Leuven)

American Journal of Health Economics, 2019, vol. 5, issue 1, 8-41

Abstract: Recent research suggests that parental job loss has negative effects on children's outcomes, including their academic achievement and long-run educational and labor market outcomes. In this paper we turn our attention to the effects of parental job loss on children's health. We combine health data from 16 waves of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, which allows us to use a fixed-effects specification and still have a large sample of parental job displacements. We find that paternal job loss is harmful to children's physical and mental health, particularly among children in low–socioeconomic status families. By contrast, we find that maternal job loss does not have detrimental effects on child health. Increases in public health insurance coverage compensate for close to half of the loss in private coverage that follows parental displacement, and we find no significant changes in medical-care utilization.

Keywords: child health; job loss; displacement; unemployment (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: I12 J13 J63 J65 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2019
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/pdf/10.1162/ajhe_a_00106 (application/pdf)
Access to PDF is restricted to subscribers.

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ucp:amjhec:v:5:y:2019:i:1:p:8-41

Access Statistics for this article

More articles in American Journal of Health Economics from University of Chicago Press
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Journals Division ().

 
Page updated 2019-11-16
Handle: RePEc:ucp:amjhec:v:5:y:2019:i:1:p:8-41