EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Valuing reductions in on-the-job illness: 'presenteeism' from managerial and economic perspectives

Mark V. Pauly, Sean Nicholson, Daniel Polsky, Marc L. Berger and Claire Sharda
Additional contact information
Mark V. Pauly: Health Care Systems Department, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA, Postal: Health Care Systems Department, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA
Daniel Polsky: General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA, Postal: General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA
Marc L. Berger: Global Health Outcomes, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA, Postal: Global Health Outcomes, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA
Claire Sharda: Integrated Health Management, Merck & Co., Inc., West Point, PA, USA, Postal: Integrated Health Management, Merck & Co., Inc., West Point, PA, USA

Health Economics, 2008, vol. 17, issue 4, 469-485

Abstract: This paper reports on a study of manager perceptions of the cost to employers of on-the-job employee illness, sometimes termed 'presenteeism,' for various types of jobs. Using methods developed previously, the authors analyzed data from a survey of more than 800 US managers to determine the characteristics of various jobs and the relationship of those characteristics to the manager's view of the cost to the firm of absenteeism and presenteeism. Jobs with characteristics that suggest unusually high cost (relative to wages) were similar in terms of their 'absenteeism multipliers' and their 'presenteeism multipliers.' Jobs with high values of team production, high requirements for timely output, and high difficulties of substitution for absent or impaired workers had significantly higher indicators of cost for both absenteeism and presenteeism, although substitution was somewhat less important for presenteeism. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Date: 2008
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (29) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.1266 Link to full text; subscription required (text/html)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:17:y:2008:i:4:p:469-485

Access Statistics for this article

Health Economics is currently edited by Alan Maynard, John Hutton and Andrew Jones

More articles in Health Economics from John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Wiley Content Delivery ().

 
Page updated 2019-12-04
Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:17:y:2008:i:4:p:469-485