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COSTS AND BENEFITS OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN SWITZERLAND

Frank Vöhringer, Marc Vielle (), Philippe Thalmann (), Anita Frehner, Wolfgang Knoke, Dario Stocker and Boris Thurm
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Frank Vöhringer: LEURE Laboratory, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland†Econability, Fischermatt 12, CH-3127 Mühlethurnen, Switzerland§Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences, University of Bern, Schanzeneckstrasse 1, CH-3001 Bern, Switzerland
Anita Frehner: LEURE Laboratory, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland¶Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Ackerstrasse 113, CH-5070 Frick, Switzerland∥Wageningen University & Research, Animal Production Systems Group, Wageningen, The Netherlands
Wolfgang Knoke: LEURE Laboratory, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland**Wolfgang Knoke Forschungsagentur, Unterster Zwerchweg 14, D-60599 Frankfurt, Germany
Dario Stocker: LEURE Laboratory, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland‡Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, University of Bern Falkenplatz 16, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland§Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences, University of Bern, Schanzeneckstrasse 1, CH-3001 Bern, Switzerland
Boris Thurm: LEURE Laboratory, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland

Climate Change Economics (CCE), 2019, vol. 10, issue 02, 1-34

Abstract: Understanding the economic magnitude of climate change (CC) impacts is a prerequisite for developing adequate adaptation strategies. In Switzerland, despite new climate scenarios and impact studies, only few impacts have been monetized. Our objective is to assess costs and opportunities of CC for Switzerland by 2060, while enhancing the assessment methods. Using inputs from bottom-up impact studies, we simulate the economic consequences of climate scenarios in a computable general equilibrium (CGE) framework. We cover health, buildings/infrastructure, energy, water, agriculture, tourism, the spill-overs to other sectors, and international effects. Due to data constraints, significant impacts have not been quantified, e.g., for heat waves and droughts more extreme than the 2060 average climate. For the considered impacts, welfare decreases by 0.37% to 1.37% in 2060 relative to a reference without CC. Higher summer temperatures increase mortality and decrease productivity. Contrariwise, tourism benefits from extended summer seasons. Regarding energy, increased demand for cooling is overcompensated by savings in heating.

Keywords: Climate change impacts; adaptation; Switzerland; computable general equilibrium model (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2019
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DOI: 10.1142/S2010007819500052

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