EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Nudging in education

Mette Trier Damgaard and Helena Nielsen ()
Additional contact information
Mette Trier Damgaard: Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University, Denmark, Postal: 8210 Aarhus V, Denmark

Economics Working Papers from Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University

Abstract: Can we nudge children, adolescents and their parents to make better decisions on education? And can we nudge teachers to support and encourage better decision making? Education decisions are taken at young ages and involve immediate costs and potential, future benefits. In such settings behavioural barriers (e.g. lack of self-control, limited attention and social norms) likely influence choices and this may motivate the use of low cost ‘nudges’ to gently push behaviour in the desired direction. Our review of nudging interventions shows that while nudging often has positive effects, the greatest effects often arise for individuals affected most by the behavioural barrier targeted by the intervention. Hence understating underlying behavioural mechanisms is crucial. Negative effects may arise in situations where nudges potentially crowd-out intrinsic motivation, if nudges pressurise individuals, or in situations where the choice architect has an insufficient understanding of behavioural mechanisms.

Keywords: Behavioural bias; boost policies; human capital investment (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D03 D04 I20 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-cbe, nep-evo and nep-neu
Date: 2017-06-08
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
ftp://ftp.econ.au.dk/afn/wp/17/wp17_05.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: Nudging in education (2018) Downloads
Working Paper: Nudging in Education (2018) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:aah:aarhec:2017-05

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Economics Working Papers from Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University
Bibliographic data for series maintained by ().

 
Page updated 2019-05-10
Handle: RePEc:aah:aarhec:2017-05