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THE IMPACT OF REMITTANCES ON ECONOMIC GROWTH: EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE FROM SOUTH AFRICA

Sheilla Nyasha and Nicholas Odhiambo ()

No AESRIWP16, Working Papers from African Economic and Social Research Institute (AESRI)

Abstract: In this paper, we have empirically examined the impact of remittances on economic growth in South Africa over the period from 1970-2019. The study was motivated by the conflicting empirical findings that have emerged in the literature on the impact of remittance on economic growth in various countries. The study was also motivated by the need to find an empirical backing on the assertion that remittances are good for economic growth and can play a key role in lowering the inequality levels in developing countries. Using the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) bounds testing approach, the empirical results, contrary to expectations, have revealed that in South Africa, remittances have a negative impact on economic growth, irrespective of whether the regression analysis is conducted in the long run, or in the short run. The study, therefore, cautions policy makers when it comes to policies related to harnessing remittances for economic growth. The study argues that it is not only remittance inflows that matter, but also how the remittances are utilised to influence economic growth.

Pages: 26
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https://aeri.co.za/RePEc/afa/afa-wpaper/AESRIWP16.pdf Revised version, 2022 (application/pdf)

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Working Paper: The Impact of Remittances on Economic Growth: Empirical Evidence from South Africa Downloads
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