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Drivers and persistence of death in conflicts: global evidence

Simplice Asongu (), Joseph Uduji () and Elda Okolo-Obasi ()
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Joseph Uduji: University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria
Elda Okolo-Obasi: University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria

No 20/066, Working Papers of the African Governance and Development Institute. from African Governance and Development Institute.

Abstract: We investigate persistence and determinants of deaths from conflicts in a sample of 163 countries for the period 2010 to 2015. The empirical evidence is based on Generalised Method of Moments. First, the findings are contingent on income levels, religious-domination, landlockedness, regional proximity and legal origins. The persistence of deaths in internal conflict is more apparent in coastal, French civil-law and Islam-oriented countries, compared to landlocked, English common law, Christian-oriented countries, respectively. Second, the following factors are generally responsible for driving deaths from internal conflicts: homicides, conflict intensity and conflicts fought. Furthermore, incarcerations have negative effects on internal conflicts. Justifications for the established tendencies and policy implications are discussed.

Keywords: War; Conflicts; Global evidence; Persistence (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: H56 L64 K42 P50 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 35
Date: 2020-01
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Forthcoming: World Affairs

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http://www.afridev.org/RePEc/agd/agd-wpaper/Driver ... ath-in-conflicts.pdf Revised version, 2020 (application/pdf)

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Working Paper: Drivers and persistence of death in conflicts: global evidence (2020) Downloads
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