EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

WHO PAYS THE COSTS OF NON-GMO SEGREGATION AND IDENTITY PRESERVATION, AND WHO IS TO BLAME?

Marion Desquilbet and David Bullock ()

No 22011, 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada from American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association)

Abstract: The paper analyzes the welfare effects of the introduction of GMO technology into a market in which a fraction of consumers refuses to buy GMOs. Our theoretical model recognizes that segregation and identity preservation (IP) of non-GMOs may create costs for both IP producers and non-IP producers. Our results show how GMO-hating consumers may win or lose from the introduction of GMO technology. If IP creates costs for non-IP producers, indifferent consumers and GMO producers may be made worse off because others refuse to consume GMOs. If GMO rejection is strong, IP producers win when GMOs are introduced, even though they do not produce GMOs.

Keywords: Food; Consumption/Nutrition/Food; Safety (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 36
Date: 2003
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/22011/files/sp03de02.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ags:aaea03:22011

DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.22011

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada from American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association) Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by AgEcon Search ().

 
Page updated 2020-11-26
Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea03:22011