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THE ROLE OF ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATION ON CONCENTRATIONS OF U.S. LIVESTOCK SECTORS

Murat Isik

No 20401, 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO from American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association)

Abstract: The industrialization of U.S. beef, dairy, hog, and poultry sectors has received considerable attention. There have been regional shifts in the geographical location of livestock inventories and livestock farms. This paper examines the trends in geographical concentrations of livestock sectors in the U.S., and determines whether the environmental regulations have impacted the geographical concentrations. It uses an entropy-based geographical concentration measure to determine the extent of concentrations of beef, dairy, hog, and poultry inventories and farms. The results show that livestock productions on a national level and within states are becoming more geographically concentrated. The geographical concentration of livestock sectors is negatively related to the stringency of state environmental regulations.

Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy; Livestock Production/Industries (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2004
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ags:aaea04:20401

DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.20401

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