EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

The Effect of Vacant Building Demolitions on Crime under Depopulation

Christina Plerhoples

No 125003, 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington from Agricultural and Applied Economics Association

Abstract: The United States government spent almost $200 million on vacant building demolitions between 2008 and 2011 under the Neighborhood Stabilization Program alone.2 One of the main justifications for these demolitions is that they reduce the crime caused by vacant buildings. However, it is unclear whether demolitions remove crime or merely displace it to other areas within a city. In this paper, I examine this question using block level monthly panel data from Saginaw, Michigan to estimate a Poisson fixed effects model of the effect of vacant building demolitions on crime. I also analyze the spatial impacts of demolitions through use of spatial lags of demolitions. To control for the endogeneity of crime and demolitions, I compare only those blocks that have had a demolition in that month to those that have a permit pending for a demolition. Initial results indicate that one demolition decreases crime over a six month period by 7.896 crimes, reduces violent crime by 3.906 crimes, and reduces property crime by 9.62 crimes. Using estimates from Levitt (2002), the cost effectiveness of these crime reductions is superior to that of police.

Keywords: Community/Rural/Urban; Development (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 42
Date: 2012
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-ure
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (2) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/125003/files/PlerhoplesRev.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ags:aaea12:125003

DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.125003

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington from Agricultural and Applied Economics Association Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by AgEcon Search ().

 
Page updated 2021-01-16
Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea12:125003