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A Decade of Natural Gas Development: The Makings of a Resource Curse?

Jeremy Weber ()

No 150407, 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. from Agricultural and Applied Economics Association

Abstract: Many studies find that areas more dependent on natural resources grow more slowly – a relationship known as the resource curse. For counties in the south-central U.S., I find little evidence of an emerging curse from greater natural gas production during the 2000s. Increases in population mitigated a rise in average compensation and crowding out of the non-mining sector. Each gas-related mining job created a little more than two jobs, indicating a neutral effect on resource dependence as measured by employment. Furthermore, changes in the adult population by education level reveal that greater production did not lead to a less educated population.

Keywords: Production Economics; Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies; Resource /Energy Economics and Policy (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 34
Date: 2013
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-ene
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ags:aaea13:150407

DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.150407

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