EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Emissions Trading versus a Carbon Tax

William Acworth and Brett Janissen

No 303804, 2010 Conference (54th), February 10-12, 2010, Adelaide, Australia from Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society

Abstract: It is now widely accepted that human induced greenhouse gas emissions are resulting in climate change. Uncertainty surrounding the timing, severity, and costs of climate change has led to debate over the most appropriate policy response. There is a consensus that market based solutions such as Emission Trading Schemes (ETS) or carbon taxes are more efficient policy responses when compared to command and control standard based regulation. However, whether to apply an ETS or a carbon tax as the primary policy response to reduce greenhouse emissions is a question that divides expert opinion. This paper assesses the efficiency and political economy implications of these two measures. The merits of the two policies are assessed with regard to: • treatment of uncertainty; • impact on short and long term carbon prices; • dynamic efficiency; • revenue raising capacity; • implementation and administration costs; • political acceptability; and • international consistency.

Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy; Environmental Economics and Policy (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 19
Date: 2010-02
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/303804/files/A ... 0policy%20makers.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ags:aare10:303804

DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.303804

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in 2010 Conference (54th), February 10-12, 2010, Adelaide, Australia from Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by AgEcon Search ().

 
Page updated 2021-01-16
Handle: RePEc:ags:aare10:303804