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Analysing factors limiting the adoption of improved maize varieties by small-scale maize farmers in Ga-Mamadila Village of Polokwane Municipality, Limpopo

L. Gidi, J. Hlongwane and M. Nkoana

No 284760, 2018 Annual Conference, September 25-27, Cape Town, South Africa from Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA)

Abstract: The modern way of practising agriculture is moving at a snail pace among small-scale farmers despite the scientifically proven improved technology which is currently used to enhance agricultural productivity. This study was conducted in Ga-Mamadila village of Polokwane Municipality in Limpopo Province. The main aimed of the study was to analyse factors limiting the adoption of improved maize varieties (IMVs) by small-scale farmers. Data was collected through a cross-section design, using a quantitative approach. Purposive sampling method was employed and a total of 75 small-scale maize farmers (40 adopters and 35 non-adopters) were sampled based on probability proportional to sample size. Data analysis was done through descriptive inferential statistics and econometric modelling using logistic regression model. Findings show that gender was negatively significant to the adoption of IMVs at 5% level. Household income, access to extension services and membership in association were positively significant to the adoption of IMVs at 10%, 5% and 1% respectively. The study recommends that the benefits of using IMVs should be highlighted through extension agents and information sources to enhance the adoption rate of improved maize varieties.

Keywords: Improved Maize Varieties; Adoption; Extension Agents; Small-scale maize farmers; Crop; Production/Industries (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2018-09-25
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ags:aeas18:284760

DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.284760

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