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Land sharing vs. land sparing for biodiversity: How agricultural markets make the difference

Marion Desquilbet, Bruno Dorin () and Denis Couvet

No 182809, 2014 International Congress, August 26-29, 2014, Ljubljana, Slovenia from European Association of Agricultural Economists

Abstract: We show that whether intensive or extensive farming is most beneficial to biodiversity depends on the equilibrium of agricultural markets. With higher production costs, extensive farming tends to be more beneficial to biodiversity than intensive farming, except when there is a very high degree of convexity between biodiversity and yield. Extensive farming is detrimental to consumers while its effect on agricultural producers is indeterminate. It has no straightforward effect on food security, but could decrease the pressure on protected areas. Additional demand f reinforces the preference for extensive farming, especially in the case of animal feed.

Keywords: Land; Economics/Use (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-agr
Date: 2014-08
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Related works:
Working Paper: Land sharing vs. land sparing for biodiversity: how agricultural markets make the difference (2015)
Working Paper: Land sharing vs. land sparing for biodiversity: How agricultural markets make the difference (2015) Downloads
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