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Perish or prosper: Trade patterns for highly perishable products

Erling Vårdal (), Frank Asche () and Hans-Martin Straume

No 261278, 2017 International Congress, August 28-September 1, 2017, Parma, Italy from European Association of Agricultural Economists

Abstract: Trade with highly perishable agricultural products like fresh fish has increased substantially. The perishability of these products appears to challenge conventional wisdom when it comes to food trade, which emphasizes the importance of large shipments to reduce transportation costs. In this paper, gravity models and several margins of trade are estimated for the trade with fresh salmon, a highly perishable product. The results indicate that increased geographical distance have a larger negative effect than what is generally reported. Most interestingly, the number of exporters and the shipment frequency increase while there is little impact on shipment size when trade increase.

Keywords: Agribusiness; Agricultural and Food Policy (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-agr and nep-int
Date: 2017-08-28
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