EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Endogenous Economic Reforms and Local Realities: Cotton policy-making in Burkina Faso

Jonathan Kaminski and Renata Serra

No 116227, Discussion Papers from Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Agricultural Economics and Management

Abstract: This paper explores the case for believing endogenous reforms to be more developmental than externally-imposed reforms, by drawing on the recent unorthodox experience of cotton sector reform in Burkina Faso. We address questions about reform emergence, feasibility, developmental impact, and sustainability. Our analysis, which carefully incorporates local social and political realities, suggests that the urban elites dominating the Burkinabè state favoured a particular cotton reform process, because it provided them with higher rents; while allowing for some rent distribution to the rural world which secured national consensus around reform. Endogenous reforms, though more feasible, are not necessarily more sustainable over time. In Burkina Faso, the initial reform benefits were eroded after 2006. We interpret this as due to the inability of the new institutional equilibrium to win over the ressure from changed stakeholder incentives, as well as to a loss of responsiveness of the rural leadership to its base.

Keywords: Agricultural Finance; Environmental Economics and Policy; Financial Economics; International Development (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 40
Date: 2011
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-afr, nep-agr and nep-cis
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (5) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/116227/files/en ... mic%20reforms....pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ags:huaedp:116227

DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.116227

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Discussion Papers from Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Agricultural Economics and Management Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by AgEcon Search ().

 
Page updated 2020-10-21
Handle: RePEc:ags:huaedp:116227