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The Rhythm of the Rains: Seasonal Effects on Child Health in The Gambia

Ousman Gajigo and Benjamin Schwab

No 125788, 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil from International Association of Agricultural Economists

Abstract: We analyze the consequences of seasonal variation in maternal consumption on child health using two nationally representative Gambian household surveys. Seasonal fluctuation in consumption stems from difficulties borrowing when incomes are low during the rainy season and saving when they peak after harvest. The resulting fluctuations in maternal nutritional intake can affect birth outcomes and lactational performance. Using mother fixed effects to isolate the effect of birth season, we find that child health—measured by weight-for-age and height-for-age—varies significantly with birth timing. Children in farm households born during dry seasons (February-June) fare considerably worse than siblings born in other seasons.

Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy; Consumer/Household Economics; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; Food Security and Poverty (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 47
Date: 2012
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-afr, nep-agr, nep-dem and nep-dev
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ags:iaae12:125788

DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.125788

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