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Is prohibiting child labour enough? Coffee certification and child schooling in Ethiopia and Uganda

K.T. Akoyi, F. Mitiku and M. Maertens

No 275958, 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia from International Association of Agricultural Economists

Abstract: Private sustainability standards are spreading rapidly in global agri-food value chains as a means of communicating important aspects of safety, ethics and environmental attributes of food production, to consumers. A cross-cutting requirement for most standards is the prohibition of child labour intended to improve child welfare. In this paper, we investigate the child schooling implications in the coffee sector in Ethiopia and Uganda. We use cross-sectional household survey data and probit, tobit, propensity score matching and difference-in-difference techniques to estimate the impact of certification on schooling. We find that FT certification increases the likelihood of children to be enrolled in secondary school by 25% and, primary and secondary schooling efficiency by 10% and 16%, respectively. We find that RA certification has no impact on both school enrolment and schooling efficiency. The results imply that prohibition of child labour alone is not sufficient to improve schooling outcomes and that FT keeps its child welfare promises in South Western Ethiopia and Eastern Uganda.

Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy; International Development; International Relations/Trade (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-agr and nep-int
Date: 2018-07
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