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HIV/AIDS and Agrarian Livelihoods in Zambia: A Test of the New Variant Famine Hypothesis

Nicole Mason, Antony Chapoto (), Thomas Jayne () and Robert Myers ()

No 54489, Food Security Collaborative Working Papers from Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics

Abstract: Since the southern African food crisis of 2001/02, the ‘new-variant famine’ (NVF) hypothesis first proposed by de Waal and Whiteside (2003) has become an important part of the conventional wisdom surrounding the relationship between HIV/AIDS and food crises in the region. The NVF hypothesis suggests that HIV/AIDS is eroding agrarian livelihoods and exacerbating the effects of drought and other shocks on agrarian communities. These concepts have begun to shape the HIV/AIDS mitigation and food security policies and programs of governments and development agencies. To date, however, there is a dearth of empirical evidence to support the NVF hypothesis, and there have been no studies specifically designed to tests its predictions.

Keywords: Crop Production/Industries; Health Economics and Policy (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 51
Date: 2007
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ags:midcwp:54489

DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.54489

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