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Poverty, AIDS, Orphanhood, Gender, and Child Schooling in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Review of the Evidence

David Mather

No 119319, Food Security International Development Working Papers from Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics

Abstract: There is growing concern that the HIV/AIDS epidemic may reduce long-term human capital development through reductions in child schooling in SSA, thus severely limiting the longterm ability of orphans and their extended families to escape poverty. In response, some have called for targeted schooling subsidies for orphans and other children made vulnerable by HIV/AIDS, on the assumption that such children are under-enrolled. This paper provides an overview of the data sources used by existing empirical studies that test for orphan schooling deficits and the methodological challenges that they face. It then reviews the empirical evidence on the effects of orphan status or adult mortality on child schooling, as well as the prevalence of orphans in SSA and their living arrangements.

Keywords: Food; Security; and; Poverty (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 42
Date: 2011-11
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-afr, nep-dem, nep-dev and nep-hea
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ags:midiwp:119319

DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.119319

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