EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Global Antitrust Prosecution of Modern International Cartels

John Connor ()

No 28610, Staff Papers from Purdue University, Department of Agricultural Economics

Abstract: International cartelists face investigations and possible fines in a score of national and supranational jurisdictions, but the three with the most consistent legal responses to global cartels are the United States, Canada, and the EU. This paper examines the antitrust fines and private penalties imposed on the participants of 167 international cartels discovered during 1990-2003. While more than US$ 10 billion in penalties has been imposed, it is doubtful that such monetary sanctions can deter modern international cartels. The apparently large size of government fines is distorted by one overwhelming case. Moreover, deterrence is frustrated by the failure of compensatory private suits to take hold outside of North America and the near absence of fines in most Asian jurisdictions. Without significant increases in cartel detection, in the levels of expected fines or civil settlements, or expansion of the standing of buyers to seek compensation, international price fixing will remain rational business conduct.

Keywords: Agribusiness; Agricultural and Food Policy (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 31
Date: 2004
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (14) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/28610/files/sp04-15.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: Global Antitrust Prosecutions of Modern International Cartels (2004) Downloads
Working Paper: GLOBAL ANTITRUST PROSECUTIONS OF MODERN INTERNATIONAL CARTELS (2004) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ags:puaesp:28610

DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.28610

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Staff Papers from Purdue University, Department of Agricultural Economics Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by AgEcon Search ().

 
Page updated 2020-02-08
Handle: RePEc:ags:puaesp:28610