EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Technological Change and Economies of Scale in Danish Agriculture

Svend Rasmussen

No 24185, Unit of Economics Working Papers from Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Food and Resource Economic Institute

Abstract: This paper presents the results of an empirical analysis of technological change and economies of scale in Danish agriculture. The estimation is based on a multi-output, multi-input translog cost function and covers the period 1973-1995. The results show that technological change varied considerably. The average rate of technological change was highest on arable farms (4.0% per year) and lowest on dairy farms (1.0% per year), with pig farms in between (2.2% per year). Alt three farm types showed an increasing trend in technological change over time, and technological changes were typically biased. The elasticity of size was considerably above 1 for both small and large arable farms and dairy farms indicating a considerable economic incentive to increase the farm size. For pig farms only the small farms showed a clear incentive to increase the farm size. The results support the hypothesis that policy measures have had a significant influence on the differences in development within the three farm types analysed.

Keywords: Research; and; Development/Tech; Change/Emerging; Technologies (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 32
Date: 2000
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (1) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/24185/files/ew000007.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ags:rvaewp:24185

DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.24185

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Unit of Economics Working Papers from Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Food and Resource Economic Institute Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by AgEcon Search ().

 
Page updated 2020-03-29
Handle: RePEc:ags:rvaewp:24185