EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Participation in USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP): Effect of Local Labor Market Conditions in Oregon

Erik Scherpf, Bruce Weber, Deana Grobe and Mark Edwards

No 277565, Economic Research Report from United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service

Abstract: This study investigates the relationship between local economic conditions in Oregon and spell lengths of USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Using different indicators of economic conditions and different definitions of local labor market areas, the report finds evidence that improved labor market conditions were associated with an increased probability that a SNAP recipient in Oregon ended a participation spell. When local labor markets are delineated as commuting zones—our preferred definition—our results suggest that a 10-percent increase in local employment raises the average recipient’s probability of program exit by nearly 7 percent. The report shows that—when labor market conditions are measured in a more localized way than is typically done—SNAP recipients are found to be more responsive to labor market conditions.

Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics; Environmental Economics and Policy; Farm Management; Production Economics (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-ure
Date: 2018-09-24
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/277565/files/err257.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ags:uersrr:277565

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Economic Research Report from United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by AgEcon Search ().

 
Page updated 2018-10-27
Handle: RePEc:ags:uersrr:277565