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Land Degradation in Ethiopia: What do Stoves Have to Do with it?

Zenebe Gebreegziabher, Gerrit van Kooten and Daan van Soest ()

No 37026, Working Papers from University of Victoria, Resource Economics and Policy

Abstract: Land degradation is a particularly vexing problem in developing countries; as forests are depleted, crop residues and dung are used for fuel, which degrades cropland. In Ethiopia, the government encourages tree planting and adoption of energy efficient stove technologies to mitigate land degradation. We use data from 200 households in Tigrai, Ethiopia to examine the adoption of new stove technologies. Adoption is an economic decision, related to savings in time spent collecting fuel and cooking, and cattle required for everyday purposes. Results indicate adopters of efficient stoves reduce respective wood and dung use by 68 and 316 kg per month.

Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy; Land Economics/Use; Resource /Energy Economics and Policy (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 27
Date: 2005-12
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Related works:
Working Paper: Land Degradation in Ethiopia: What Do Stoves Have To Do With It? (2006) Downloads
Working Paper: Land degradation in Ethiopia: What do stoves have to do with it? (2005) Downloads
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ags:uvicwp:37026

DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.37026

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