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Costs of Creating Carbon Offset Credits via Forestry Activities: A Meta-Regression Analysis

Gerrit van Kooten, Susanna Laaksonen-Craig and Yichuan Wang

No 37039, Working Papers from University of Victoria, Resource Economics and Policy

Abstract: The main focus of efforts to mitigate climate change is on the avoidance of fossil fuel emissions. However, the Kyoto rules permit the use of forestry activities that create carbon offset credits. These could obviate the need for lifestyle-changing reductions in fossil fuel use. It is necessary for policy purposes, therefore, to determine the cost effectiveness of creating forest sink carbon credits. In this study, meta-regression analyses with 1047 observations from 68 studies are used to determine factors that affect carbon sequestration costs. Results indicate that soil carbon is not very important, but that forest plantations and use of biomass for energy make forestry activities more attractive. It also turns out that forestry activities are competitive with emissions reduction in tropical regions and, perhaps, boreal regions, but certainly not in Europe. Finally, the regression estimates are used to project the potential costs of carbon uptake for various forest management scenarios.

Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy; Resource /Energy Economics and Policy (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 35
Date: 2007-11
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ags:uvicwp:37039

DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.37039

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