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Conspicuous Consumption and Darwin's Critical Sexual Selection Dynamic That Thorstein Veblen Missed

Jon Wisman ()

No 2016-03, Working Papers from American University, Department of Economics

Abstract: Thorstein Veblen's theory of conspicuous consumption is one of his most powerful contributions to social science. Conspicuous consumption is undertaken in an attempt to maintain or increase social standing. But why do humans seek to acquire status through their consumption practices? Or more fundamentally, why do they seek status? Veblen does not present it as grounded in an instinct such as his instincts of parental bent, workmanship or idle curiosity, although he claims that "the propensity for emulation is probably the strongest and most alert and persistent of the economic motives proper… a pervading trait of human nature." But why? Had he read Darwin, or read him more carefully, he would have picked up on Darwin's concept of sexual selection and recognized it as the driving force behind conspicuous consumption as well as much other behavior intended to favorably impress others, if not the driving force behind all of his instincts. Sexual selection is a form of natural selection that works through mate selection as opposed to physical survival. How much an individual can consume signals an ability to command resources essential for successfully raising children. This article adds the Darwinian depth that Veblen missed to his important concept of conspicuous consumption, and in doing so adds clarity to humanity's prospects.

Keywords: Darwin; sexual selection; status; inequality; evolution (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: B15 B52 D11 P47 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2016
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-hme, nep-hpe and nep-pke
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https://doi.org/10.17606/w9sk-n337 First version, 2016 (application/pdf)

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