EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

The Distributional Impact of Climate Change: Why Food Prices Matter

Eeshita Gupta (), Bharat Ramaswami () and E. Somanathan
Additional contact information
Eeshita Gupta: Indian Statistical Institute and KPMG
Bharat Ramaswami: Ashoka University

No 50, Working Papers from Ashoka University, Department of Economics

Abstract: We analyze the impact of agricultural productivity losses stemming from climate change in an economy without frictions. The first-order GDP impacts are expected to be small. But the poor have higher food budget shares and food prices will rise. How do distributional impacts diverge from the GDP impact? This is the question that is addressed. The paper considers two major sets of comparative statics: the effect of trade and the effect of economic growth. The model is calibrated to Indian data of 2009 and projections for 2030. The percentage loss of income for the landless is six times the GDP impact in a closed economy. Trade halves this effect and economic growth moderates it substantially. Despite the food price rise, nearly all farmers lose from climate change. The model is simple enough for impact channels to be transparent.

Keywords: Climate change; distribution; food prices; general equilibrium; India (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 38 pages
Date: 2021-02
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-agr and nep-env
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://dp.ashoka.edu.in/ash/wpaper/paper50.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: The distributional impact of climate change:Why food prices matter (2017) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ash:wpaper:50

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Working Papers from Ashoka University, Department of Economics
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Ashoka University ().

 
Page updated 2021-10-16
Handle: RePEc:ash:wpaper:50