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International Migration in the Atlantic Economy 1850 - 1940

Timothy Hatton () and Zachary Ward

No 2, CEH Discussion Papers from Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University

Abstract: This chapter focuses on the economic analysis of what has been called the age of mass migration, 1850 to 1913, and its aftermath up to 1940. This has captured the interest of generations of economic historians and is still a highly active area of research. Here we concentrate on migration from Europe to the New World as this is where the bulk of the literature lies. We provide an overview of this literature focusing on key topics: the determinants of migration, the development of immigration policy, immigrant selection and assimilation, and the economic effects of mass migration as well as its legacy through to the present day. We explain how what were once orthodoxies have been revisited and revised, and how changes in our understanding have been influenced by advances in methodology, which in turn have been made possible by the availability of new and more comprehensive data. Despite these advances some issues remain contested or unresolved and, true to cliometric tradition, we conclude by calling for more research.

Keywords: Mass migration; the Atlantic economy; immigrants and emigrants. (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: N31 N32 J61 F22 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-his, nep-int, nep-lab and nep-mig
Date: 2018-02
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:auu:hpaper:063

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